Popular motorcycle…myths?

The superstitions can sometimes run deep in the motorcycle sphere. Some seemingly legit while others just out of this world bogus. Whether you’re a veteran rider, or just getting a taste of the two-wheeled life, you would’ve heard a few, wondered if they were true and how on earth they came to be.

 

As goes your helmet, so goes your…head?
There is a superstition and myth in the riding world which are much the same, both involve dropping a motorcycle helmet. One calls it bad luck for a rider to drop their helmet, even once, from any distance. The other is about a rider replacing their helmet if it’s dropped, regardless of the height it falls from or what it lands on. While bikers are free to hang onto their superstitious beliefs, the myth of replacing a fallen helmet is just that, a myth.

Loud pipes save lives
There is NO evidence to prove it. In fact, many modern drivers have the windows wound up and stereo blasting in their air-conditioned cars, so they can’t even hear emergency services sirens pointed at them, let alone an exhaust pipe that is facing away from them!

Never ride in the rain
There were three reasons often repeated against riding in the rain – it rusted the bike, the roads are too slippery and there is no way to stay dry. Modern bikes are treated for rust prevention, modern tyres are much grippier in the wet and today’s motorcycle gear is very protective.

Green Motorcycles
A green painted motorcycle is supposedly bad luck. Who knew and has anyone told Kawasaki?

The origins of this superstition may be from the many messengers who died riding the military green-painted motorcycles during World War II. It could also have come from all the riders who bought the olive-green painted WWII-era Harley-Davidson WLA bikes refurbished after the war which were previously used and most likely in rough conditions. Or the fact that the colour green symbolises jealousy and envy.

But again, what era are we living in? Motorcycles and riders alike are outfitted with the technology and know-how designed to make riding as safe as possible — whatever colour your bike is.